Stevie Ray Vaughn – Couldn’t stand The Weather

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Artist: Stevie Ray Vaughn
Title: Couldn’t Stand The Weather
Genere: Blues, Electric blues
Released: 1984
Label: Epic
Format: CD
Musicians:Stevie Ray Vaughan – Guitar/Vocals, Tommy Shannon – Bass, Chris Layton – Drums, Jimmy Vaughn- 2nd guitar, Fran Christina – Drums, Stan Harrison – Sax
Producer: John Hammond, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Chris Layton, Tommy Shannon, Richard Mullen, Jim Capfer
Engineer: Richard Mullen, Rob Eaton

Couldn’t Stand the Weather is the second studio album by American blues rock band Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble. Recording sessions took place in January 1984 at the Power Station in New York City.
Stevie Ray Vaughan wrote half the tracks on Couldn’t Stand the Weather. In 1999, a reissue of the album was released which contains an audio interview segment and studio outtakes.
In 2010, the album was reissued again as the Legacy Edition containing two CDs with a previously unreleased studio outtake and an August 17, 1984 concert at The Spectrum in Montreal, Canada.

During January 1984, Vaughan and Double Trouble spent 19 days at the Power Station in New York City.
Vaughan’s brother, Jimmie Vaughan, played rhythm guitar on “Couldn’t Stand the Weather” and “The Things (That) I Used to Do”.
For “Stang’s Swang”, drummer Fran Christina and saxophonist Stan Harrison recorded parts for the track.

Not only could SRV play guitar like no other, but he also had a great blues voice. The CD I have is from 1984 and manufactured in Japan. I think this CD was well produced as the album was well recorded. It really sounds good for a CD from the 80s. In fact, I’m not certain the vinyl version would sound any better, but it may. Everything is right with this LP CD or otherwise. One can hear every detail as it is mixed well.
Couldn’t Stand the Weather is the second studio album by American blues rock band Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble. It was released on May 15, 1984, by Epic Records as the follow-up to the band’s critically and commercially successful 1983 album, Texas Flood.
Stevie Ray Vaughan wrote half the tracks on the album. In 1999, a reissue of the album was released which contains an audio interview segment and studio outtakes.
In 2010, the album was reissued again as the Legacy Edition containing two CDs with a previously unreleased studio outtake and an August 17, 1984 concert at The Spectrum in Montreal, Canada.
I have the Epic release which is what I am reviewing here.

This is one of my favorite SRV albums.
“Scuttle Buttin” – Bang out of the gate, this opener is one of the most thrilling songs by SRV. It’s an instrumental and short at a minute 49 seconds, but when you hear it you’ll know why it’s only under 2 minutes. How long can you play at that speed? The bass work is also very good on this song.

“Couldn’t Stand The Weather” – This is the title track. Great drum work on this as well. You can tell how well produced and recorded the CD was by this track.
“The Things (That) I Used To Do” – This  is a twelve bar blues number written and originally performed by Eddie Jones aka Guitar Slim – It just feels like you want to settle in and listen and appreciate it when you hear it.

“Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)” – This is a song recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1968. It contains much improvised guitar and a vocal from Hendrix, backed by Noel Redding on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums. The song is one of Hendrix’s best known; it was a feature of his concert performances throughout his career.
After his death in 1970, “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)”, using the title “Voodoo Chile” was released in the UK. Several artists have performed or recorded versions of the song. SRV is one of those artists that do the song justice and then some. His version is one of the best I’ve ever heard. I might even say its better than the original in a way.

“Cold Shot” – (originally credited to Michael Kindred and W. C. Clark; later incorrectly credited to only Michael Kindred). If I had to have a least favorite track on this album, this one would be closest, but it’s still good.

“Tin Pan Alley” – This is the first track recorded for the LP and is the old blues standard, which was done in one take. This is the longest song on the album. It’s a slow, mellow blues number and another good settle in and listen song like the third track previously. This is recorded so well you can hear even the lightest touch on guitar and drums.

“Honey Bee” – This track kind of brings the energy back in a fun way. It’s more of a groove, blues/rock sound.

“Stangs Swang” – A little swing jazz number to finish off the LP. This one features  drummer Fran Christina and saxophonist Stan Harrison both whom recorded parts for the track.

Music = 5_Star_Rating_System_5_stars
Sound = 5_Star_Rating_System_5_stars

Scuttle Buttin live (electric)

Now trying doing that solo on 12-string acoustic!


Voodoo Chile Live (The best version is live at the El Mocambo, but I can’t get that one, so you’ll have to settle for this).

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