H Nilsson – Nilsson Schmilsson


Artist: Harry Nilsson

Genre: Singer-Songwriter, Pop
Title: Nilsson Schmilsson
Released: 1971
Label: RCA/Victor
Format:Vinyl
Musicians:Harry Nilsson – vocals; piano, Mellotron, organ, harmonica, electric piano, Jim Gordon – drums,percussion, Klaus Voormann – bass, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar, Chris Spedding – guitar, Herbie Flowers – bass, John Uribe – acoustic guitar, lead guitar
Additional personnel: Henry Krein – accordion, Richard Perry – percussion, Mellotron,
Jim Price – trumpet, trombone, horn arrangements, Jim Keltner – drums, Roger Coolan – organ, Bobby Keys – saxophone, Gary Wright – piano, organ, Paul Buckmaster – string and horn arrangements, Roger Pope – drums, Caleb Quaye – guitar, Ian Duck – acoustic guitar, Jim Webb – piano, George Tipton – string and horn arrangements.
Producer: Richard Perry
Engineer: Robin Geoffrey Cable
Mix Engineer: Doug Sax

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Nilsson Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994), usually credited as Nilsson, was an American singer-songwriter who achieved the peak of his commercial success in the early 1970s. His work is characterized by pioneering overdub experiments, returns to the Great American Songbook, and fusions of Caribbean sounds. A tenor with a three-and-a-half octave range, Nilsson was one of the few major pop-rock recording artists of his era to achieve significant commercial success without ever performing major public concerts or undertaking regular tours.

Born in Brooklyn, Nilsson fled to Los Angeles as a teenager and landed a job as a computer programmer at a bank. It was there that he cultivated an interest in musical composition and close-harmony singing, and was successful in having some of his songs recorded by various artists such as the Monkees, and later, Three Dog Night, who had a No. 5 hit with his song “One”. In 1967, he debuted on RCA Victor with the LP Pandemonium Shadow Show, followed with a variety of releases that include a collaboration with Randy Newman (Nilsson Sings Newman, 1970) and the original children’s story The Point! (1971). After a brief period of widely publicized, alcohol-fueled antics with John Lennon — the two collaborating in 1974 for the album Pussy Cats — Nilsson left RCA, and his record output subsequently diminished. In response to Lennon’s 1980 death by shooting, he took a hiatus from the music industry to campaign for gun control. For the rest of his life, he recorded only on sporadic occasions. In 1994, Nilsson died of a heart attack while in the midst of recording new material for a since-unreleased comeback album.

Nilsson’s recording contract was picked up by Tower Records, which in 1966 released the first singles actually credited to him by name, as well as the debut album Spotlight on Nilsson. None of Nilsson’s Tower releases charted or gained much critical attention, although his songs were being recorded by Glen Campbell, Fred Astaire, The Shangri-Las, The Yardbirds, and others. Despite his growing success, Nilsson remained on the night shift at the bank.

Nilsson signed with RCA Records in 1966 and released an album the following year, Pandemonium Shadow Show, which was a critical (if not commercial) success. Music industry insiders were impressed both with the songwriting and with Nilsson’s pure-toned, multi-octave vocals. One such insider was Beatles press officer Derek Taylor, who bought an entire box of copies of the album to share this new sound with others. With a major-label release, and continued songwriting success (most notably with The Monkees, who had a hit with Nilsson’s “Cuddly Toy” after meeting him through their producer Chip Douglas), Nilsson finally felt secure enough in the music business to quit his job with the bank. Monkees member Micky Dolenz maintained a close friendship until Nilsson’s death in 1994

Side Note: Nilsson’s 1970s London flat, at Flat 12, 9 Curzon Street on the edge of Mayfair, was a two-bedroom apartment decorated by the ROR (“Ringo or Robin”) design company owned by Starr and interior designer Robin Cruikshank. Nilsson cumulatively spent several years at the flat, which was located near Apple Records, the Playboy Club, Tramp and the homes of friends and business associates. Nilsson’s work and interests took him to the US for extended periods, and while he was away he lent his place to numerous musician friends. During one of his absences, former The Mamas & the Papas singer Cass Elliot and a few members of her tour group stayed at the flat while she performed solo at the London Palladium, headlining with her torch songs and “Don’t Call Me Mama Anymore”. Following a strenuous performance with encores on July 29, 1974, Elliot was discovered in one of the bedrooms, dead of heart failure at 32.

On September 7, 1978, The Who’s drummer Keith Moon returned to the same room in the flat after a night out, and died at 32 from an overdose of Clomethiazole, a prescribed anti-alcohol drug. Nilsson, distraught over another friend’s death in his flat, and having little need for the property, sold it to Moon’s band mate Pete Townshend and consolidated his life in Los Angeles.

Nilsson Schmilsson is the seventh album by American singer Harry Nilsson, released by RCA Records in November 1971. It was Nilsson’s most commercially successful work, producing three of his best-known songs. Among these was the number 1 hit “Without You”, written by Pete Ham and Tom Evans of the group Badfinger. The album was the first of two Nilsson albums recorded in London and produced by Richard Perry. “Jump into the Fire” and “Coconut”, both written by Nilsson, also became hits.

 

Side one
1. “Gotta Get Up”
2. “Driving Along”
3. “Early in the Morning” (Leo Hickman, Louis Jordan, Dallas Bartley) – “Early in the Mornin'” or “‘Early in the Morning” is a song that was recorded by Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five in 1947. It is an early example of a blues which incorporates Afro-Cuban rhythms and percussive instruments.
4. “The Moonbeam Song” – This is another stream of consciousness song written by Harry Nilsson. Most of his songs were stream of consciousness.
5. “Down”

Side two
1. “Without You” (Pete Ham, Tom Evans) – “Without You” is a song written by Pete Ham and Tom Evans of British rock group Badfinger, and first released on their 1970 album No Dice. The song has been recorded by over 180 artists and versions released as singles by Harry Nilsson (1971) and Mariah Carey (1994) became international best-sellers. Paul McCartney once described the ballad as “the killer song of all time”.
First recorded by the rock group Badfinger, the song was composed by two of its members. Two streams, referring to real events in the songwriters’ lives flowed together to create the song. Pete Ham had written a song originally titled “If It’s Love” but it had lacked a strong chorus. At the time of writing the band shared residence with the Mojos at 7 Park Avenue in Golders Green. One evening, in the midst of the parties, songwriting, touring, in Golders Green, Ham and his girlfriend Beverly Tucker were about to go out for the evening. But just as they were leaving Tom Evans said he had an idea for a song – Ham said, ‘Not tonight, I’ve promised Bev.’ But she thought he would be wondering if he had done the right thing later, if he went out, – she told him – ‘Go into the studio, I’m fine about it..’ He said, ” Your mouth is smiling, but your eyes are sad.” The song Ham wrote that night was called ‘If its Love’ and has the verse “Well I can’t forget tomorrow, when I think of all my sorrow, I had you there but then I let you go, and now it’s only fair that I should let you know..if it’s love..” But Pete wasn’t happy with the chorus.”
Events in Evans’ love life would lead to the completion of the track. While Evans was touring in Cologne he had met the woman who would become his future wife, Marianne. She moved to London. It was a sparky relationship. “One evening he went to her friend Karen and told Karen, ‘She’s left me. I need her back. I can’t live without her.’ He flew to Bonn to find her – he wrote a song called ‘I Can’t Live’. Its chorus; “I can’t live, if living is without you, I can’t live, I can’t give any more.” And so the merging of the two songs, Ham and Evans created the hit. Harry Nilsson, at the time best known for his hit “Everybody’s Talkin'” and for composing such hits as Three Dog Night’s “One”, heard Badfinger’s recording of “Without You” at a party and mistook it for a Beatles song. After realising it was not, he decided to cover the song for his album Nilsson Schmilsson in 1971. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Without_You_(Badfinger_song) Uh, the Badfinger version is better.

2. “Coconut” – This is a song written and first recorded by Harry Nilsson, released as the third single from his 1971 album, Nilsson Schmilsson.The lyrics feature four characters (the narrator, the brother, the sister, and the doctor), three of whom (narrator, sister, and doctor) are sung in different voices by Nilsson. The song describes a story in which a girl has a stomach ache and calls her doctor who prescribes her a drink. With the help of her brother, they concoct a beverage consisting of lime and coconut. When the sister calls the doctor late at night, the doctor (annoyed at being awakened by such a complaint) laughs her off and recommends that she “put the lime in the coconut and drink ’em both together”—then call him in the morning. It has been noted on more than one occasion that the song is symbolic of pregnancy and morning sickness. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_(song)

3. “Let the Good Times Roll” (Shirley Goodman, Leonard Lee) – “Let the Good Times Roll” is a song that was recorded by Shirley and Lee in 1956. This song was written by the duo, Shirley Goodman (later Shirley Pixley) and Leonard Lee.

4. “Jump into the Fire” – Written by Nilsson, the song is in the hard rock style and marked a departure from his previous work. The recording was produced by Richard Perry and includes a segment where the bass player, Herbie Flowers, audibly detunes his instrument. “Jump into the Fire” is a rock song written and performed in a style that likens to the early-1970s sound of the Rolling Stones. Nilsson recorded the song in London in 1971 for his Nilsson Schmilsson album. As with much of the material on the album, it marked a departure from his previous work, as Nilsson was keen for commercial success after years of recognition as a quality artist and songwriter. The musicians on the basic track were Nilsson (on piano), Chris Spedding (guitar), Herbie Flowers (bass) and Jim Gordon (drums). Flowers recalls that Nilsson gave only vague instructions for the song: “lots of tom-toms, a bass riff in D major.” The bass guitar part includes a section where, following Gordon’s drum solo, Flowers detunes the instrument as he plays. According to Flowers, he began loosening the bottom string “for a laugh”, believing the performance would have faded out already on the released recording. Overdubs on this master take included Nilsson’s vocals, guitar solos by John Uribe and another rhythm guitar part, played by Klaus Voormann. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jump_into_the_Fire

5. “I’ll Never Leave You”

MUSIC:
SOUND:

https://youtu.be/TsSuueEGQSM (Lime In The Coconut)

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